Florida Facts Florida Facts

Summarized View:

Florida is a U.S. state located in the southeastern United States. It was named by Juan Ponce de Leon, who landed on the coast on April 2, 1513, during Pascua Florida ( Spanish for "Flowery Easter," referring to the Easter season).Florida is known as the Sunshine State. "Florida" is a Spanish adjective which means "flowery."

Florida-Health-Ins-Fact

The U.S. Postal abbreviation is FL.

There have been several USS Floridas named in honor of this state.

  • USS Florida (1869) a frigate
  • USS Florida (1903) a monitor or early type of submarine
  • USS Florida (1911) a battleship
  • USS Florida (1983) is an Ohio-class submarine missile submarine

History

Archaeological finds indicate that Florida had been inhabited for many years prior to any European settlements. Spaniards first arrived in 1513 and lay claim to a large, imprecisely defined area extending from about modern day Gainesville northward to the Carolinas, which they called La Florida. Over the following century, the Spanish and French both established settlements in Florida, with varying degrees of success.

The area of Florida diminished with the establishment of British colonies to the north and French colonies to the west. Control of parts of Florida passed among Spanish, British, and American control. Spain finally ceded Florida to the United States with the Adams-OnĂ­s Treaty in 1819, in exchange for the US renouncing any claims on Texas. On March 3, 1845, Florida became the 27th state of the United States of America. Today, Florida is one of the most populous states in the Union.

As of 2006, Florida has an estimated population of 17,789,864, an increase of 404,434 (2.3%) from the prior year and an increase of 1,807,040 (11.3%) since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 246,058 people (that is, 1,115,565 births minus 869,507 deaths) and an increase from net migration of 1,585,704 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 528,085 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 1,057,619.

Demography

More than 16 percent of Florida's population was Hispanic. The largest reported ancestries in the 2000 Census were German (11.8%), Irish (10.3%), English (9.2%), American (8%) and Italian (6.3%).

African Americans and/or Blacks, who during the cotton- and sugar-plantation era of the legalized slavery days, and during the post- Civil War reconstruction era, made up fully 50 percent of the state's population, have a large presence in northern Florida. Jacksonville has more than 250,000 black residents, surpassing pre-Katrina New Orleans in the number of African Americans.

By 2025, blacks are predicted to be the majority of Jacksonville's population. Gainesville, and Fort Lauderdale too have large black populations. In addition, there is a large Haitian-descended population in Miami.

Florida's Hispanic community consists particularly of Cubans in Miami and Tampa, large Puerto Rican populations in Tampa and Orlando, and Central American migrant workers in inland West-Central and South Florida. The Hispanic community continues to grow more affluent and mobile: between the years of 2000 and 2004, Lee County in southwest Florida, a largely suburban jurisdiction, had the fastest Hispanic population growth rate of any county in the United States.

Click here for our dental insurance options

Whites of all ethnicities are present in all areas of the state. Particularly, those of British ancestry are present in large numbers in the coastal cities. There is a large German population in Southwest Florida, a sizeable and historic Italian and Jewish communities in the Miami area, and white Floridians of many generations in the culturally southern areas of inland and northern Florida.

Native white Floridians, especially those who have descended from long-time Florida families, are affectionately referred to as "Florida Crackers."

Florida Health Insurance Plan Quotes

Government and Law

The Florida Legislature has a Senate of 40 members and a House of 120 members. The current governor is Republican Jeb Bush , brother of President George W. Bush.

Though Florida has traditionally been a Democratic state, in recent years explosive population growth has brought with it many Republicans, leaving the state approximately evenly split between the two parties. As such, and because of its high population and large number of electoral votes, Florida is considered by political analysts to be a key swing state in elections for President of the United States.

In Miami, liberal Democrats vie for control with Cuban conservative Republicans and their business allies. Tampa was once a hotbed of Democratic union support, but has reversed polarity completely in recent years, and is now governed by heavily pro-business Republicans. Outside of the liberal Southeastern part of the state, the Florida Democratic Party tends to be socially conservative and heavily associated with the good ol' boy network.

Economy

Florida 's economy is heavily based on tourism. Warm weather most of the year and many miles of pristine beaches provide a thriving vacation spot for travelers from around the world.

The large Walt Disney World theme park and resort complex, located near Orlando , drives the economy of that area, along with more recent entries into the theme park arena such as the Universal Orlando Resort. The great amount of sales tax revenue is what allows the state to be one of the few to not levy a personal income tax.

Other major industries include citrus fruit and juice production, banking, and phosphate mining.

Florida, as a whole, is a magnet for many retirees and this has caused many jobs to be created in industries servicing this population.

In recent years Southeastern Florida has become the unofficial financial capital of Latin America.

Many parts of the state, especially Northern Florida are heavily dependant on U.S. department of Defense spending.

Education

Florida's public-school revenue per student and spending per $1000 of personal income usually rank in the bottom 25 percent of U.S. states. Average teacher salaries rank near the middle of U.S. states.Florida public schools have consistently ranked in the bottom 25 percent of many national surveys and average test-score rankings. Many education surveys are not scientific, but do measure prestige.

Governor Jeb Bush has been criticized by many Florida educators for a program that penalizes under performing schools (as indicated by standardized tests, most prominently the FCAT) with fewer funding dollars, though supporters claim the program's tough measures have resulted in vast improvements to the education system.

Despite controversies regarding the primary and secondary schools, Florida is home to many well-respected institutions, such as University of Florida, the University of Miami, and Florida State University.

Highways

Florida's interstates,state highways and U.S. Highways are maintained by the Florida Department of Transportation.Florida's interstate highway system contains 1,473 miles (2,371 km) of highway, and there are 9,934 miles (15,987 km) of non-interstate highway in the state, such as Florida state highways and U.S. Highways. There are also several toll roads, totaling 515 miles (830 km) of the state highway system.

Florida's primary interstate routes include:

  • I-4, which bisects the state, connecting Tampa, Lakeland , Orlando, and Daytona Beach.
  • I-10, which traverses the panhandle, connecting Jacksonville, Lake City, Tallahassee, and Pensacola.
  • I-75, which enters the state near Lake City and continues southward through Gainesville, Ocala, Tampa's eastern suburbs, Bradenton , Sarasota, and Fort Myers to Naples, where it crosses the "Alligator Alley" as a toll road to Fort Lauderdale before turning southward and terminating in Hialeah.
  • I-95, which enters the state near Jacksonville and continues a long the Atlantic Coast through Daytona Beach, Melbourne/Titusville , Palm Bay, Vero Beach, Fort Pierce , Saint Lucie West (in Port Saint Lucie), Stuart, West Palm Beach , and Ft. Lauderdale before terminating in Miami.
  • I-595, which connects I-75, I-95, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport and Port Everglades.
  • I-75, a toll road, passes through the Everglades between Naples and Fort Lauderdale has been grand fathered as a toll road from its original construction as S.R. 84.
  • The Florida Turnpike, a toll road, begins at Interstate 75 south of Ocala and continues southeast through Orlando, Port Saint Lucie, south through the western suburbs of Fort Lauderdale (Coral Springs, Weston, Pembroke Pines) to Miami, and ending in Homestead.

Economy

Florida 's economy is heavily based on tourism. Warm weather most of the year and many miles of pristine beaches provide a thriving vacation spot for travelers from around the world.

The large Walt Disney World theme park and resort complex, located near Orlando , drives the economy of that area, along with more recent entries into the theme park arena such as the Universal Orlando Resort. The great amount of sales tax revenue is what allows the state to be one of the few to not levy a personal income tax.

Other major industries include citrus fruit and juice production, banking, and phosphate mining.

Florida, as a whole, is a magnet for many retirees and this has caused many jobs to be created in industries servicing this population.

In recent years Southeastern Florida has become the unofficial financial capital of Latin America.

Many parts of the state, especially Northern Florida are heavily dependant on U.S. department of Defense spending.

Education

Florida's public-school revenue per student and spending per $1000 of personal income usually rank in the bottom 25 percent of U.S. states. Average teacher salaries rank near the middle of U.S. states.Florida public schools have consistently ranked in the bottom 25 percent of many national surveys and average test-score rankings. Many education surveys are not scientific, but do measure prestige.

Governor Jeb Bush has been criticized by many Florida educators for a program that penalizes under performing schools (as indicated by standardized tests, most prominently the FCAT) with fewer funding dollars, though supporters claim the program's tough measures have resulted in vast improvements to the education system.

Despite controversies regarding the primary and secondary schools, Florida is home to many well-respected institutions, such as University of Florida, the University of Miami, and Florida State University.

Highways

Florida's interstates,state highways and U.S. Highways are maintained by the Florida Department of Transportation.Florida's interstate highway system contains 1,473 miles (2,371 km) of highway, and there are 9,934 miles (15,987 km) of non-interstate highway in the state, such as Florida state highways and U.S. Highways. There are also several toll roads, totaling 515 miles (830 km) of the state highway system.

Florida's primary interstate routes include:

  • I-4, which bisects the state, connecting Tampa, Lakeland , Orlando, and Daytona Beach.
  • I-10, which traverses the panhandle, connecting Jacksonville, Lake City, Tallahassee, and Pensacola.
  • I-75, which enters the state near Lake City and continues southward through Gainesville, Ocala, Tampa's eastern suburbs, Bradenton , Sarasota, and Fort Myers to Naples, where it crosses the "Alligator Alley" as a toll road to Fort Lauderdale before turning southward and terminating in Hialeah.
  • I-95, which enters the state near Jacksonville and continues a long the Atlantic Coast through Daytona Beach, Melbourne/Titusville , Palm Bay, Vero Beach, Fort Pierce , Saint Lucie West (in Port Saint Lucie), Stuart, West Palm Beach , and Ft. Lauderdale before terminating in Miami.
  • I-595, which connects I-75, I-95, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport and Port Everglades.
  • I-75, a toll road, passes through the Everglades between Naples and Fort Lauderdale has been grand fathered as a toll road from its original construction as S.R. 84.
  • The Florida Turnpike, a toll road, begins at Interstate 75 south of Ocala and continues southeast through Orlando, Port Saint Lucie, south through the western suburbs of Fort Lauderdale (Coral Springs, Weston, Pembroke Pines) to Miami, and ending in Homestead.
  • Add a quote engine to your website for Free! We'll even create the website for you for Free!
    There are No Catches! It's free and always will be.

    * The information provided is intended for licensed insurance agents only. It is not intended for the purpose of advertising the insurance products to the general public.

    "Best system in industry for insurance agents - anything less in not acceptable.

    Step number #1 - NAAIP's technology helps producers project themselves as top level professional with minimal time and effort.

    Step number #2 - Being among the largest brokerages in the insurance industry, allows agents access to top commissions and resources on every case.

    Commitment to growing this relationship is nurtured by providing best in class service. Our attorneys, underwriters, case managers and sales experts will help you grow your business - one client at a time. Welcome to our team, a system that is uniquely suited for insurance professionals in this new millennium."

    Aaron Levy - Website Owner, NAAIP.org

    Moses Newman - Chief Technical Officer, NAAIP.org